Saturday, 31 December 2016

Norway Tours

Let us have a look at the most popular tours offered in Norway. In this article, we will discuss the offers for no longer than one day.

Norway Tours

NORWAY IN A NUTSHELL

Norway in a Nutshell is the most famous tour around Norway’s stunning landscapes – fjords and mountains. You will experience the scenic Norwegian Railways – Bergen Railway, Flåm Railway – have a look at the Aurlandsfjord, the Nærøyfjord and the hair pin bends of Stalheimskleiva.

Norway Tours

The tours are offered from May to September and are available as a day trip or as an adventure with overnight stays. You can start from Oslo, Bergen, Voss or Flam. The tour is available all year and can be completed in a day.

WHALE SAFARI

Calm and massive giants, whales are an embodiment for our planet's fragile ecological balance.

The town of Andenes situated at the Vesterålen archipelago is one of the most popular whale tours’ points in Norway. Similar excursions start from Tromsø, Sommarøy and Stø. The season usually lasts from the middle of May to the middle of September. Some companies organize winter tours on demand.

Norway Tours

Often tourists are guaranteed to see whales: if you do not see one, you can go tomorrow again free of charge. The search is carried out with a sonar – a device that catches whales’ “talks” in ultra-sonic range. Moreover, whale safari offers wonderful views, fresh sea air and unforgettable natural beauty.

DOG SLEDDING

If vast snow-covered valleys, frosty air in the face and high speed lure you, dog sledding tour is an ideal pastime for you. Clever huskies are commonly used for dog sledding. On a typical dog sledding trip, they will pull you at high speed across the Norwegian wilderness.


Multiple firms across the country offer tours of varying length and difficulty. In Northern Norway Finnmark, Svalbard and Narvik are among the most popular destinations with many local suppliers. Dog sledging tours are also available in other parts of Norway. Check out Alaskan Husky Tours in Røros, Høve Støtt in Geilo, or Sirdal Husky Farm.

CLIMBING

The Lofotens is a preferred destination for many mountain-climbers. The most used areas for climbing are located between Svolvær and Henningsvær. You can go in the mountains with your own equipment or turn to a company that offers guided climbing tours in Lofoten, such as Nordnorsk Klatreskole or Northern Alpine Guides.

NATURE SAFARI

Norway Tours

Nature Safari in the Lofotens takes place from mid-October until mid-January. Participants go out in large boats and rubber dinghies to look for sea eagles, seals and other local wildlife. If you are lucky, you might even see a killer whale!

HORSE RIDING 

Norway Tours

Ride along running roads and hidden paths. Sitting on the back of a horse you can reach far into the wilds and come close to the primal unspoiled nature. On organized tours you will be accompanied by expert guides. You can choose among indoor riding, riding trips for the experienced and for beginners, plus opportunities to hire a horse by the hour.

CAVES

If you are looking for something unusual, go down the glacier caves of Svalbard. Or visit famous mountain caves of Nordland. Cave tours lasts from one to several hours and offer various levels of difficulty. Everyone can find a suitable tour in the Norwegian underworld!

REINDEER SLEDGING

Let reindeer drag you across the white valleys of Finnmark in Northern Norway. Travelling at a gentle pace through snow-covered forests and across motionless plateaus provides you with an insight into the ancient Sami way of life. If you are lucky, you will enjoy Northern Lights just above your head!

Norway Tours

Comfortably wrapped up under warm reindeer skins in your sledge, you will submerge into the silence and the beauty of the surroundings. All you can hear is the peaceful crunching of the sledge as it glides smoothly over the snow. If you are seeking for something more adventurous, speed up a little by being pulled along by a reindeer whilst you stand on skis.

SEGWAY TOURS

Sightseeing city-tours by segways! Segway tours are the best way to enjoy the city's major sites and in the same time have fun with this unique personal transporter. Training is usually given to all riders in advance. Segway tours are offered in Oslo, Bergen and Kristiansand.

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Friday, 30 December 2016

Travel to Norway

Have you always been dreaming about going to Norway but have not done it yet? Why?

Travel to Norway

Possibly, you think that the country is too far away and it takes quite an effort to get there. This is not true. There are many direct flights to Norway from many cities around the world. And if you happen to live relatively close to this country, you may get there by sea, by train, by bus – or even by your own car!

BY PLANE

The main country’s airport – Gardermoen – is situated in Oslo. It accommodates regular flights from 140 cities all over the world. You will find direct flights to Norway from East and West coasts of the USA and some European countries. If you fly from Australia or New Zealand, you will have to make a transfer.

Travel to Norway

The majority of international flights arrive at Oslo airport. Other international airports are in Bergen, Kristiansand, Moss, Sandefjord, Stavanger, Tromsø and Trondheim. If you need to get to another region, be ready for a transfer. Norway has more than 50 airports, so you can easily travel by plane inside the country, for example to reach such far away regions as the Lofotens, Nordkapp or Svalbard.

The most convenient way to get from Gardermoen to the center of Oslo is by train Flytoget. The ride takes just 20 minutes. Express-buses and regional trains are also an option.

BY TRAIN 

A vast network of rails connects Norway with other Scandinavian countries and Europe. Regular trains shuttle between Oslo and Copenhagen several times per week.

Travel to Norway

The majority of trains departing from Europe are night trains, with compartments and sleeping places.

BY BUS 

Buses to Norway depart from Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Russia. Buses from Gothenburg in Sweden and Copenhagen in Denmark set off almost hourly. And from Stockholm – even more often.

Travel to Norway
 
Minibuses connect Kirkenes in Norway with Murmansk in Russia. There is bus connection between the towns of Bodø and Mo i Rana and Sweden, as well as between Stavanger and Denmark.

BY CAR 

The majority of cars come from Sweden, however Norway has boarders with Finland and Russia as well. Be prepared to a passport control and custom clearance.

Travel to Norway

Among the most important highways to Norway it is worth to mention European route E6 that passes through Malmö, Helsingborg, and Gothenburg in Sweden and crosses the border in Svinesund on South-East of Norway; and route E8 that goes through the Finnish towns of Turku, Vaasa, and Oulu, and crosses the Finnish-Norwegian border in Kilpisjärvi.

BY WATER 

You may take a ferry to Norway from Denmark, Sweden, Germany and the UK. In Oslo, Bergen, Kristiansund and Stavanger there are marines for private boats.

Travel to Norway

Norway is a popular cruise destination. The majority of the liners follow to the fjords and coastal cities like Bergen. They make regular stops in Svalbard, Honningsvåg, Tromsø, Hammerfest, Trondheim, and Ålesund. Find your own way to Norway!


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Wednesday, 28 December 2016

Norway Fjords

Fjords are a true miracle of Norway. During the Ice Age, the mountain inlets appeared in the western part of the country, and as the glacier moved away, they created curved sea creeks. Fjords are cozily located in the northern part of the western coast. Because of warm Gulf Stream, the climate in the region is soft and mild. Even in winter, water in the fjords practically never freezes.

Norway Fjords

The best way to enjoy the fjords is from the coast and from the water – i.e. from a car window and from a ferry. Multiple tours include waterfalls, small fishing villages and mysterious grottos.

Fjords can be found in many countries, the Norwegian ones are the most picturesque. Although it is impossible to visit every fjord in Norway, you may see the most beautiful ones! 

GEIRANGERFJORD 

Geirangerfjord is known as the jewel of the Norwegian fjords. With its distinctive S-shaped powerful waterfalls, snow-covered mountain peaks and abandoned mountain farms, the fjord is included into UNESCO’s list of World Heritage sites.

Norway Fjords

The fjord lures tourists with its panoramic views, breathtaking waterfalls and magnificent natural beauty. Every year roughly 600 thousand visitors around the world come here to see this natural masterpiece. Special viewpoints are constructed at Dalsnibba Mountain, the Eagle Road, and Scagefla farm.

HARDANGERFJORD 

Hardangerfjord is called the Queen of fjords. It is world famous for its fruit orchards. In the end of spring – beginning of summer countless apple and cherry trees start to bloom and make the fjord even more beautiful.

Norway Fjords

Hardangerfjord is situated not far from Voss. The touristic routes include a boat-trip (Hardangerfjord Express or MS Peer Gynt are especially popular) along the fjord and the excursion to the Hardangervidda plateau with the outstanding views to the local glaciers and waterfalls. The most picturesque waterfall here is Vøringsfossen 182 meters high, of which 145 meters is a direct drop.

HJØRUNDFJORD 

With its length of 35 km, Hjørundfjord is one of the longest fjords in Norway. It is often called "a hidden pearl" of the Fjord Region because although it is surrounded by world-famous Sunnmøre Alps, the fjord itself remains something of a secret, left out of other tourist routes.

Norway Fjords

The fjord is easily reachable from Ålesund. Harmonious combination of the transparent-blue fjord, lush high mountains and pastoral life of local villages wait for you!

LYSEFJORD 

Lysefjord is located in the southern part of the Fjord Region, close to Stavanger. It is widely known for the extraordinary mountain formations of Kjerag and Preikestolen (Preacher’s Pulpit).

Norway Fjords

Lysefjord means "Light fjord", derived from the light-colored granite rocks of its banks. If you want to see the fjord in all its beauty, join in an organized cruise. Small tourist boats stop in the middle of the Lysefjord allowing visitors to admire the breathtaking 400-meter high Hengjanefossen Waterfall.

NÆRØYFJORD 

Nærøyfjord is a branch of Sognefjord and is famous for its untouched nature. The 17 km long fjord is only 250 meters in its narrowest point. You will enjoy snow-covered mountain peaks, waterfalls, coniferous forests and small farms clinging to the mountainsides. In winter, mountains are covered with snow, waterfalls freeze and turn into blocks of ice.

Norway Fjords

The name Nærøyfjord originates from "Njord", the Norwegian god of seafarers and the sea. Since 2005, the fjord has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

SOGNEFJORD 

Sognefjord, or the King of fjords, is the longest and the deepest of Norway fjords. Its depth is 1308 meters and its length is almost 200 km, making it the largest fjord in Europe, and the second in the world just after the Scoresby Sund in Greenland. Sognefjord offers magnificent views of unspoiled nature.

Norway Fjords

Natural beauties combined with unique cultural heritage make the fjord an ideal place for family vacation. Here you may find the striking cultural sites – wooden churches. There are 28 wooden churches left in Norway, and five most ancient of them are located not far from the Sognefjord, the oldest one is Urnes Stave Church. Not far from the Sognefjord, there is a small town of Voss, the center for outdoor adventures.


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Friday, 23 December 2016

God Jul! Christmas in Norway

For the majority of Norwegians, Christmas is the most favorite and honored holiday. "Merry Christmas" in Norwegian is "God Jul!", however the etymology of the word "jul" is still unclear.

God Jul! Christmas in Norway

In Norway, the tradition of jul (or jol) dates back to the pre-Christian, pagan times when during the darkest season the ancestors of modern Norwegians asked pagan gods to return the sun. The fest itself was quite amusing, with a lot of people, beer and viands.

The majority of Norwegians start to prepare for the fest four weeks before the holiday itself – in the time of Advent (adventtiden). People buy presents to their relatives and friends, plan their Christmas dinner and decorate their houses. Traditionally they perform a huge home clearance.

Norwegian Father Christmas is called Julenissen, Christmas gnome. People cook for him porridge – julegroet. Full up and happy, Julenissen brings presents to children. He wears a red hat and has a long white beard.

God Jul! Christmas in Norway

Norwegians spend a fortune for the presents to their children, relatives and friends. Although it is difficult to tell what present is the most popular, children know that gifts can be of two types – "soft" and "hard" (blote / harde pakker). And they rush to open "hard" packets first as children everywhere prefer new toys to new clothes.

Another Norwegian tradition is to send postcards to their relatives, friends and colleagues. Usually it is accompanied with a family photo, picture of kids, pets or a sender himself or herself.

God Jul! Christmas in Norway

Christmas is normally spent at home with family. Unlike other countries, in Norway people do not go out in the Christmas night, they prefer to be at home with their families, sing Christmas songs and carols and, maybe, reel around the Christmas tree.

Christmas dinner is of course the central part of the holiday. In good old times the table offered at least seven kinds of Christmas cookies (julekaker), scones of flour and water paste (flatbrod) as well as home-made beer. Christmas cookies are still a traditional Norwegian treat, however nowadays people do not bake more than two or three kinds, or they simply buy it in shops. Christmas beer can also be bought in a shop.

God Jul! Christmas in Norway

However other dishes are still made at home. Traditional Norwegian Christmas food includes marinade herring and cold pork roll, pork ribs baked in an oven (ribbe), minced patties (medisterkaker) or sausages (medisterpolser), braised lamb ribs (pinnekjott) and of course lutefisk. Traditionally the dishes are accompanied with potato or turnip puree.

God Jul! Merry Christmas! 


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Monday, 19 December 2016

Oslo through the Pages of Jo Nesbø

Jo Nesbø is a Norwegian writer, his works have been translated to over 40 languages. Nesbø is primarily known for his crime novels about adventures of inspector Harry Hole.

Oslo through the Pages of Jo Nesbø

Take a guided tour and visit the places in Oslo described by the writer and that play an important role for his character Harry Hole.

RADISSON BLU SCANDINAVIA HOTEL 

The walk starts with the Radisson Blu Scandinavia Hotel Oslo situated behind the Royal Palace. According to the guides, the Hotel is in the very center of what they call the land of Harry Hole. From the upper floor of the hotel you can see three city districts: where the criminals live, where the crimes happen and where Harry Hole himself lives.

THE ROYAL PALACE 

Oslo through the Pages of Jo Nesbø

You will have two stops there. First, in the park and then under the main balcony of the Palace. The guide will tell you about the political situation in the country.

KARL JOHANS GATE STREET 

The main street of the city hosts one of the departments of the University of Oslo. The guide will tell you about Hole's true love, Rakel, as well as about the National Theatre, The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Hotel Continental. All these places have significant importance for the characters of Jo Nesbø's novels.

EGERTORGET SQUARE 

Oslo through the Pages of Jo Nesbø

This square is situated just behind the Parliament, and plays a crucial role in one of the Nesbø's novels. According to the books, the imaginary hotel Leons is located just around the corner.

OSLO COURTHOUSE 

You will see the daily routine of Tinghuset – Oslo Courthouse, and the guide will tell you about the constitutional regime of Norway.

ASCHEHOUG PUBLISHING HOUSE 

Oslo through the Pages of Jo Nesbø

You will have a stop near the Aschehoug publishing house that publishes Jo Nesbø's novels. Here you will learn about Norwegian books and the demand on them worldwide. 

ST. OLAVS CHURCH 

Although Harry Hole is not religious, the guides assume that his beloved Rakel was a Catholic. You may go inside and examine one of Oslo’s catholic churches.

SOFIES GATE STREET 

Oslo through the Pages of Jo Nesbø

Harry Hole lives here. And the guides will tell you about the areas of Oslo called St. Hanshaugen and Bislett.

RESTAURANT SCHRØDER 

Harry Hole often goes to Schrøder restaurant because it is within a walking distance from his flat at Sofies Gate. Schrøder is one of few classical Oslo restaurants that offer traditional Norwegian dishes. Hans Schrøder opened his restaurant in 1925, and the interior is decorated with paintings of Oslo in the 1920s.

UNDERWATER PUB

Oslo through the Pages of Jo Nesbø

Underwater Pub is situated not far from Schrøder restaurant. When Harry Hole does not feel like going to Schrøder, he finds isolation here. After the tour you can enjoy live opera performances that are held there every Tuesday and Thursday.


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Tuesday, 13 December 2016

Winter Adventures in Northern Norway

Norway is marvelous all year round, but especially impressive in winter! Northern lights, unforgettable fishing, fairy-tale landscapes – or even surfing and diving – everyone will find something special in Northern Norway.

Winter Adventures in Northern Norway

ARCTIC SURFING 

Since 1963 there have been surfers at Unstad bay in the Lofoten Islands. Thor Frantzen and Hans Egil Krane were probably the first surfers in Norway. As young boys, they had to work on ships to earn money. The ships traveled worldwide and in Sydney, they saw and tried surfing for the first time. Back home in Lofoten they had to make their own boards.

Winter Adventures in Northern Norway

Here you can always catch a wave – a big one or a small, just emerging. The village is situated in a way that the waves move from South to North.

CAVES

If you are looking for something unusual go down the glacier caves of Svalbard. Or visit famous mountain caves of Nordland. Choose a tour that fits to your preferences and physical skills!

Winter Adventures in Northern Norway
  • Aunhola: a short walk in easy terrain for 15-20 minutes. This is a large cave that is the perfect introduction to the underworld as it not so claustrophobic. It is also one of the most interesting caves in the area as it is possible to see the relics of five different ice ages. 
  • 3 caves in 4 hours: instead of visiting one large cave, you can see three smaller caves quite different from each other. 
  • The Golden Cave: the ultimate trip to the underworld. Total length 700 meters, three side tunnels at multiple levels, and a shimmering golden coating on some of the walls unique to this cave. In this cave, you will walk through the marble passage, the limestone creek, the large cavern to the small waterfall. You will then see the mountain lake and the cylinder pass-way to the three-cave cavern. 

DIVING

Northern Norway is an ultimate place for diving. Clear water and rich flora and fauna make the underwater world a true heaven both for amateurs and experienced divers.

Saltstraumen has the world’s strongest tidal current. The combination of speed, strong currents, great depths and the unique marine life creates an amazing, beautiful and intense, dive environment that is very demanding in the same time. The visibility is usually very good, especially in the beginning and the end of the season.

Winter Adventures in Northern Norway

Tjeldsund offers magnificent diving conditions as well. Crystal clear water allows amazing underwater hunting – you can catch lumpfish, trout, halibut or pollack even without going deep down. But the most popular sites here are shipwrecks.


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Thursday, 1 December 2016

Top Segway Tours

A segway ride is a great way to enjoy the beautiful architecture and stunning views of Norwegian cities – and a memorable adventure as well. Let us look at top four tours in a most unusual vehicle!

Top Segway Tours

BERGEN SEGWAY 

Bergen Segway offers three tours beloved by tourists.

Bergen’s Best Views 

This tour have been voted Bergen’s best Segway tour 3 years in a row among travelers from all over the world. It is developed by local experts to show all the best parts of the city while having fun.

Top Segway Tours

The tour begins right by the cruise terminal at the company's location and starts by driving through Bergenhus Fortress and it’s beautiful park. Then it continues to historical Bryggen and then to the Fishmarket. Then it drives to the Bergen Aquarium and into park Nordnes, one of Bergen’s most beautiful parks. From Nordnes it goes to Den Nationale Scene (the theatre), the Blue Stone, John’s Church, and Lille Lungegårdsvannet. Then it continues through the city of Bergen in Kalfarveien before it runs into Fjellveien. Fjellveien offers a wonderful view over the center of Bergen and the surrounding areas. From Fjellveien the tour heads back down to the city center to Bergenhus park.

Bergen Segway Experience Tour 

This tour is all about the Segway experience and the ride itself and can be adapted on request. This tour will include mountain climbing (on a segway) and park riding, and is really a fun way of seeing some amazing spots in Bergen. It will not focus on guiding, but on the experience of the segway ride. Training will be given to all riders in advance.

Bergen by Night 

This tour shows Bergen in a completely different way and in an amazing setting. It heads up to the mount Fløyen summit for a once in a lifetime breathtaking segway experience. It runs for about 2 hours, but can be adapted on request.

GUIDED SEGWAY TOUR KRISTIANSAND 

Top Segway Tours

The tour starts at the cruise pier next to Kilden Theatre and Concert Hall. It continues on to the Fish Market, Hartmann's pier, Sjøhuset, Otterdal Park, the guest harbor, Kristiansand fortress, the City Beach / Aquarama, Tangen, riverside Otra, the Old Town, Wergeland Park, the Cathedral and back to Kilden. Alternative routes can be created on request.

SEGWAY TOURS OSLO

A guided 1.5-hour tour of Oslo on a stand-up electric vehicle, buzzing around the city streets and taking in some of the top local sights. The tour passes the National Opera House, Parliament, the University of Oslo, the Royal Castle, explores the Aker Brygge neighborhood and visits Akershus Fortress.

TOURS OSLO 

Tours Oslo offers a wonderful sightseeing tour. It is certainly the best way to see all the city's major sites on the same time as having fun with this unique personal transporter.

Top Segway Tours

Oslo Tours will start at Rådhusplassen. Tourists get an instructor and guide who himself or herself runs personal transporter with them. Orientation and training re offered about 10 minutes before departure.


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Tuesday, 29 November 2016

It Is Prohibited in Norway

Norway is famous for a number of doubtful prohibitions – some of them are outdated and some are introduced by politicians who think that they "know better" and are sure that it is necessary to protect people from themselves.

It Is Prohibited in Norway

 BOXING 

Professional box is forbidden in Norway because, according to the law of 1981, of "unhealthy economic interest and medical side effects". In 2001, a new law was adopted that prohibits all competitions in sports that allow knockouts.

DRINKING BEER IN TH ELECTION DAY 

The Wine Monopoly (Vinmonopolet) forbids selling alcoholic beverages on Sundays, holidays and election days. However, in 2005 a law came into force that allows to sell beer after 1 pm on election days.

It Is Prohibited in Norway

DRINKING BEER AND WINE IN PARKS 

Drinking alcoholic beverages in public places is punished with a fine of 1500 crones or even a detention in a jail up to six months. However, the experience shows that the police is not that strict and may turn a blind eye to drinking people whose behavior does not violate the norms. 

SOLARIUMS 

Since July 1st, 2011 it is prohibited to people younger than 18 years old to attend solar booths.

Studies show that the risk of getting a malignant melanoma increases by 75 per cent when solarium use starts before 30 years of age. "When the use of solariums among young people goes up, we have to react. The goal is to change attitudes and promote change in behavior in the population," the Minister of Health and Care Services, Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen, says.

It was also decided that all solariums must have competent staff from 1 January 2014. 

FIREWORKS 

It Is Prohibited in Norway

In Norway, fireworks can only be purchased by people 18 or older. Class 1, 2 and 3 fireworks are for sale from December 27 to December 31, and can only be fired between 6 pm and 2 am on New Year's Eve.

SEGWAYS 

For a long time politicians and lawyers could not decide what a segway was. Is it closer to a bike, roller skates or a skateboard, or is it a real transport? Finally, the issue was solved.

It Is Prohibited in Norway

As a maximal speed of a segway can reach 20 km per hour, it has to comply with all the demands applicable to a car: breaks, indicator lamps, registration, insurance and an age limit of 16.

SHOPS WORKING ON SUNDAYS 

According to the law of 1995, permanent sales areas should no work on Sundays. The exception were the shops with the area size less than 100 square meters and gas stations with the area size less than 150 square meters.

It Is Prohibited in Norway

Such shops were nicknamed "Brustadbuer" ("Brustad shacks") – after Sylvia Brustad, a Norwegian politician for the Norwegian Labor Party – until the law was quietly repealed in 2003. Brustad herself claimed that she had not personally advocated the law, but that she was required to follow through on a decision within the Party.


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© 2016 All Rights Reserved

Friday, 25 November 2016

The Most Beautiful Summer Festivals in Norway

Imagine that you are on a beautiful small island in the ocean, listening to your favorite group under midnight sun. Or pretend to be a Viking at the Lofoten islands. In summer, Northern Norway wakes up and offers you a variety of festivals. We will tell you about four the most interesting ones!

The Most Beautiful Summer Festivals in Norway

TRÆNA MUSIC FESTIVAL 

Since 2003, the Træna Music Festival provides fantastic memories to thousands of music lovers. A unique combination of nature, location and the atmosphere make people return there year after year. 

The Most Beautiful Summer Festivals in Norway

Træna is idyllically situated in 61 km from the Helgeland coast. The festival is held on the islands of Husøya and Sanna, and getting there by boat is an adventure in itself. There you can enjoy quality music and art under midnight sun, walk in the most beautiful sceneries and taste the best seafood. You will never forget this exceptional festival! 

RIDDU RIDDU 

Riddu Riđđu Festivàla, which means “little storm on the coast,” is an international indigenous festival that takes place in July each year in the coastal Sami Gáivuotna – Kåfjord municipality in Northern Troms. Through 25 years, the festival has worked to establish and strengthen proudness in Sami culture. The festival has an indigenous profile. In 2009, it gained national status as a key festival in Norway. 

The Most Beautiful Summer Festivals in Norway

The festival has grown to become one of the most significant international indigenous festivals in Europe. The festival has a focus on Sámi and Indigenous people’s art and culture with a diverse program for children, youth and adults; like music, films, seminars, workshops, art, literature and theatre. 

LOFOTR VIKING FESTIVAL AT THE LOFOTENS 

Vikings of Borg at the Lofoten islands have been waiting for you for 1000 years. Here you will smell tar and fire, try real Viking food and find new facts about the Viking's history. Lofotr is a popular festival that is held every year. 

The Most Beautiful Summer Festivals in Norway

During the festival, you will see how Vikings lived, participate in a fair, and watch shows and concerts thematically connected with the Viking era. School history becomes reality in Borg. This festival may become a splendid supplement for your travel around the Lofoten islands. 

TROMSO OPEN AIR FESTIVAL

Among high mountains and green trees of Tromsø, you will find Telegrafbukta Beach. It is a favorite place for camping and swimming. And once a year it hosts a music festival for all ages! 

The Most Beautiful Summer Festivals in Norway

The festival attracts people from all over the world who appreciate quality music, picturesque views and excellent atmosphere. Festival Bukta Open Air Festival welcomes such bands as Kaizers Orchestra, The Hives, Kvelertak, Shining and many others. 


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Thursday, 24 November 2016

New Facts about Norway

Norway is one of the three Scandinavian countries. Thanks to its geographical position, the country possesses vast natural resources that are used extremely efficiently. 

New Facts about Norway

1. In 2014, Norway came 1st in the world economic ranking. 

2. However, the country has the highest price for gas – $2.67 per liter of quality gas. In the same time, Norway is one off the biggest oil importers in the world. 

New Facts about Norway

3. Public universities in Norway are free for students from all over the world. 

4. Popular Japanese sushi with salmon appeared because of Norwegians who created the recipe in 1980s. 

New Facts about Norway

5. Norway is an ideal place for writers. The government buys one thousand of copies of each newly published book and distributes it among public libraries. 

6. Hornindalsvatnet is the deepest lake in Europe and is located in central Norway. Its depth reaches 514 meters. 

New Facts about Norway

7. Vinnufossen (860 meters) is the highest waterfall in Europe and number six in the world. 

8. Norway offers one of the most beneficial systems of maternity and paternity leaves. Women can have a leave up to 44 weeks and financial support of 80 per cent of their salary or 34 weeks and 100 per cent of the salary. Young fathers have a supplementary paid paternity leave of 12 weeks. 

9. By 2012, Norwegian scientists received the Nobel Prize 12 times, including 3 prizes in economics, 3 in chemistry and 2 Peace Prizes. The ceremony is held every year in Oslo

10. Jostedalsbreen lacier is the biggest in Northern Europe. 

New Facts about Norway

11. Laerdal tunnel is the longest underground road in the world. Its length is 24.5 km. 

12. Traffic rules are very strict in Norway. Drunk driving leads to 30 days in jail, possibility to lose the driving license for a year or a fine up to 10 per cent of the yearly income. 

13. Prices for food are so high in the country that many Norwegians travel to Sweden to buy everything there. 

14. Frozen pizza Grandiosa is so popular in Norway that it can be called an unofficial national dish in Norway. According to the company's statistics, they produce 24 million pizzas per year for just 4.67 million inhabitants of the country. 

New Facts about Norway

15. Norwegian national football team is in a small list of teams that never lost to Brazil. Norway won twice and twice tied the game with the multiple world champion. 

16. The majority of Norwegians take an opportunity to go to their 4-week vacations in summer. It means that considerably less people stay in the offices or shops. That is why so many tourists wonder why almost nothing is working. 

New Facts about Norway

17. Norway receive 98-99 per cent of its electrical energy from water power plants – it is the highest number in the world. 


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